Friday, February 20, 2009

State Sovereignty Bill Filed in the House Today (UPDATE - Comments from Rep. Woods)

HCR1011, a resolution affirming the sovereignty of the state of Arkansas under the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was filed this afternoon by Rep. Debra Hobbs (R-Rogers). The resolution goes on to say that this is to serve as “Notice and Demand to the federal government, as our agent, to cease and desist, effective immediately, mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers.”

The resolution is part of a grassroots movement in state legislatures across the country as a protest to the intrusion of the federal government into state government affairs. Oklahoma recently became the first state in this movement to pass this type of resolution, HJR1003. As many as twenty other states are reportedly considering similar resolutions to Oklahoma and actual resolutions have been introduced in Arizona, Hawaii, Montana, Michigan, Missouri, New Hampshire, and Washington.



New Hampshire State Representative Daniel Itse, cosponsor of New Hampshire's HCR6, explains his state’s version of the bill and the overall purpose of the movement to Fox News Host Glenn Beck.

UPDATE – I spoke with Rep. Jon Woods, who is co-sponsoring the bill along with Rep. Debra Hobbs and Rep. Roy Ragland. Rep. Woods helped explain to me why they felt this needed to be filed. Rep. Woods said that they “have been working on this legislation since June, due to the growing trend with the Federal Government that all the answers should come within Washington, D.C., whether it’s No Child Left Behind or the Fairness Doctrine.” He said that the final straw was the announcement today from the chairman of the U.S. Senate Banking Committee Chris Dodd who they may have to nationalize our banking system. Rep. Woods said, “The Federal Government is the agent to the state, we are not an agent to the Federal Government. This resolution affirm that.”

6 comments:

Brett said...

It is sad that the states have to pass a resolution reminding the Federal Government about the 10th Amendment.

Zine said...

Sadly, joint resolutions have no teeth. Wished this had teeth. If senators were selected by the state legislators then maybe their action would have some impact in DC.

Brett said...

Zine, It is nice to have someone commenting who knows a little about Constitutional History. However I'm glad we don't currently have our state legislature electing our Senators.

Nick said...

Wow, this is pure awesomeness, but a little bit scary. Deja vu and stuff. We are seeing this with the stimulus bill as well, as states like South Carolina, Texas, Louisiana and Idaho are worried about the infringement upon states rights.

freefarmgeek said...

It's a start. Here's to liberty!

Witch Azle said...

Repeal the 17th Amendment. States would then have protection from the greedy hands of the federal government — which was the Founders' intent in writing a Constitution setting up this government the way they did.